Trevor Noah: The best 5-minutes elevator conversation I had with the man.

This morning I remember writing a piece right after Trevor Noah schooled the French Prime Minister on the Daily Show. I discovered his show while visiting with a friend. If I could wish to be stuck in an elevator with anyone right now, it’s Trevor.

Trevor is classy trolling and a lot of education than any curriculum can teach you. Just looking at his personal bloginspires me with wild ideas.

I think he should be showed to secondary school students instead of those creepy film shows we used to have. Who even authorizes those things?

I hear his book “Born a Crime,” is already used in some American schools. I love Trevor for his wit and balls. He is one African American that has refused to let his identity stop him from being extra. 

Writing a lot about Trevor these days!

In my previous article published on Africa on the Blog, I wrote:

“As Trevor put it, when a black person does something terrible or not too savory, it’s labelled “African Immigrant.” As soon as an African struggles and finds his way to the top, these nations are suddenly not too reluctant to bestow them foreign identities but these identities come with a Price.

Even America which Trevor seems to credit with so much benevolence has it’s restrictions. Let’s not be too quick to forget immigrant children the Trump administration separated from their parents under its “zero tolerance” policy.

Back to France. Trevor responded to a letter from French ambassador Gérard Araud criticizing him for congratulating Africa on France’s World Cup victory. It’s not the criticism that’s the problem. It’s this idea that being African is such a thing that cannot be exclusive and combined with other forms of identity. We do not deny that the reality a lot of us have now, the reality a lot of those African French players have, is the result of colonialism. We are no longer just Africans, we are Africans with a history of colonialism and this cannot be erased.” 

Today I just want to imagine the conversation I had with Trevor stuck in an elevator for 5 minutes. I know dreams come true.

I think he would say:

  1. Why! You are so black that Africa needs to be printed on your skin. Then he’ll offer me a warm hug while I blush in embarrassment.
  2. I would tell him how I love his shows and that they taught me I could never do too much of writing. I mean if Trevor does the daily showand still manages to write books, how much writing can ever be too much?!
  3. He would then look at me and tell me how every show is part of his commitment to changing the narrative about Africa and that’s why he loves trolling Trump who currently represents all that’s wrong with the world of equality of the races. I mean, he once told Time Magazine that “Donald Trump has made everyone interested in everything, everywhere. He’s a worldwide phenomenon. And with everything that’s going on — the Muslim ban, threats to women’s rights, the environment — I feel like I can finally say the show [“The Daily Show”] has a purpose”.
  4. Trevor would ask me if I ever think of moving to the U.S. and give me a short summary of how he went from being just a South African comedian to being the New Daily show host after Jon Stewart. I would tell him, I am considering a doctorate degree there.
  5. The last bit i’d discuss with him is how I have this habit of picking up tit bits about people like him. Like how I read somewhere that he had to be hidden by his family in the apartheid days because he was German and Xhosa; a mashup of two races that were considered incompatible. How he had come out inspiring Africans to stop hiding.

Forgetting something?

I would definitely add in an application for the role of one of the drummer guys on the Daily Show, anything to be on the show with Trevor!

Writing about this even makes me feel like a stalker. I wrote last week Friday introducing Maya’s book, that I don’t hero-worship. However, there are people I revere. Trevor would be the most beautiful 5-minutes elevator conversation I would have right now. It’s a beautiful day here in South Africa, who knows? He might just be home for a visit.

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